thru traffic

Apr 23

fzztsimmons:

AGENT MAY’S MUM IS AS BADASS AS HER

THIS IS EVERYTHING I DIDN’T KNOW I WANTED AND MORE

(via lanaparriillas)

I NEED 6 SEASONS AND A MOVIE ABOUT MELINDA MAY’S MOM

(Source: vellelunarum, via lanaparriillas)

[video]

Apr 22

[video]

rubbishandsuch:

moral of this episode: no one will ever be as badass as natasha, except maybe melinda’s mom

[video]

paralysedbeaver:

Agent Koenig: You wash up on a deserted island alone. Sitting on the sand is a box. What is in that box?
Agent Simmons: That’s a hard one. Let me think.

paralysedbeaver:

Agent Koenig: You wash up on a deserted island alone. Sitting on the sand is a box. What is in that box?

Agent Simmons: That’s a hard one. Let me think.

Agh Ward is a creeeep!

Rape of Thrones · For Our Consideration · The A.V. Club -

Why are the Game Of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny?

I haven’t kept up with Game of Thrones being unable to stomach the level of onscreen violence, but it’s disheartening to hear fans outraged by changes like this. Maybe there’s a reason besides being lazy, but it still seems unnesscary.

Apr 21

latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)
After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.
The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.
Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

I remember being amazed that a mountain lion was on the front page of the LA Times when it happened, but now to see P-22 like this saddens me to no end.

latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)

After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.

The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.

Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

I remember being amazed that a mountain lion was on the front page of the LA Times when it happened, but now to see P-22 like this saddens me to no end.